RENIQUA ALLEN

Reniqua Allen is a fellow at Type Media Center, and a freelance journalist who writes and produces on issues surrounding race, class, social mobility and popular culture. Currently she is writing a book titled It Was All A Dream: How Black Millennials Are Navigating the Broken Promise of America (Nation Books/Hachette) and is working as a creative producer on Louisiana Justice, an investigative documentary about the criminal justice system.

Allen is also developing her own non-fiction narrative film project, Searching for Southern Comfort, based off an op-ed about black millennials and the reverse migration. Previously, Allen was a producer with WNYC radio for the second season of their podcast, The United States of Anxiety, which examined how “cultural warriors” influenced debates over race, religion, sexuality, and gender. Before that, Allen was a field producer for Against All Odds: The Fight for a Black Middle Class, a documentary about the economic and political challenges that the black middle class face, featuring former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert, which aired on PBS in the spring of 2016.

She has worked on a range of shows for PBS including Moyers & Company, The Bill Moyers Journal, and On Faith & Reason, and worked as an archival producer for Sundance-nominated films like Hot Coffee (HBO) and We’re Not Broke. She got her start in broadcasting working in live news for MSNBC and FOX News. She has published a range of essays and articles for outlets like: the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, Al-Jazeera, Quartz, The Nation, Congressional Quarterly, Uptown, the San Francisco Chronicle, Transition and Teen Vogue.

Allen has held fellowships with the New America Foundation and Demos, completed coursework for a PhD in American Studies from Rutgers University-Newark and is working on a dissertation that will look at what the American Dream means to young black adults in the 21st century. She has a Bachelor’s degree in journalism and political science and a Master’s degree in political science from American University.

Books
It Was All a Dream: A New Generation Confronts the Broken Promise to Black America

It Was All a Dream: A New Generation Confronts the Broken Promise to Black America

Young Black Americans have been trying to realize the promise of the American Dream for centuries and coping with the reality of its limitations for just as long. Now, a new generation is pursuing success, happiness, and freedom — on their own terms.

Recent Highlights

The Missing Black Millennial

The Missing Black Millennial

No generation has undergone such meticulous examination in recent years as the millennials. Yet our understanding of them contains a glaring gap.
By Reniqua Allen in the New Republic.

Reniqua Allen: It Was All a Dream book tour

Reniqua Allen: It Was All a Dream book tour

In It Was All a Dream, Reniqua Allen tells the stories of Black millennials searching for a better future in spite of racist policies that have closed off traditional versions of success. Many watched their parents and grandparents play by the rules, only to sink deeper and deeper into debt.

After Words on C-SPAN

After Words on C-SPAN

Is the “American Dream” is still attainable?

Reniqua Allen on Book TV’s After Words.

My Boyfriend Is White and Rich. I’m Neither.

My Boyfriend Is White and Rich. I’m Neither.

‘I was nervous about meeting his family for the first time, but as a woman of color with middle-class roots, I also worried how I would fit in with folks who were not just white but upper-class with Harvard Ph.D.s.’ By Reniqua Allen in Glamour.

Racism Is Everywhere, So Why Not Move South?

Racism Is Everywhere, So Why Not Move South?

It’s beginning to seem that black millennial culture — the center of black life — and the idea of black hope and opportunity are now squarely located in the South. By Reniqua Allen in the New York Times.

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Our work is made possible through the generous support of individuals and institutions committed to a free and independent press, civil liberties, and social justice. We are a 501(c)(3) public foundation, and donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent provided by law. If you have any questions, or would like other donation options, contact Kristine at (212) 822-0263.

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