Robert Masur Fellowship in Civil Liberties

Robert Masur Fellowship in Civil Liberties

The fellowship competition is open to first-year law students who intend to carry out significant activities during the summer (in between their first and second year) in the areas of civil rights and/or civil liberties. Fellows each receive a $2,000 honorarium. Proposed activities may include a writing or research project, work with a public interest organization in the areas of civil rights or civil liberties, work on a civil rights or civil liberties law case under the supervision of a faculty member or lawyer, or any other work in the areas of civil rights or civil liberties.

Applications for the 2022 Fellowship are now closed.

Previous Recipients

Cristina G. Gamundi Garci

2022

Cristina G. Gamundi Garci

Cristina G. Gamundi Garcia is a rising 2L at the University of Washington School of Law. She will spend her summer as a legal intern supporting the Child and Youth unit at the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project. The Child and Youth unit represents and advocates on behalf of immigrant children and youth that suffer persecution in their home country, face a lack of parental support, and experience poverty. Prior to law school, Cristina served as an interpreter on immigration cases and conducted research regarding immigration policy in Washington State. After law school, Cristina intends to pursue a career in immigration law to serve and empower immigrant populations.


Sebastián Ramírez

2022

Sebastián Ramírez

Sebastián Ramírez is a rising 2L at Notre Dame Law School. Prior to starting law school, he worked as a union organizer with UNITE HERE! Local 1 in Chicago, where he successfully helped organize and lead Chicago’s first city-wide hotel strike which resulted in significant wage and benefit increases for thousands of Chicago hospitality workers. This summer, Sebastián will work on Chicago House’s TransLegal program, an initiative that provides legal assistance to trans people facing a myriad of legal issues. This upcoming fall and spring, Sebastián will extern with Indiana Legal Services and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF). After law school, he plans to pursue a career in civil rights litigation.


2021

Lauren Neal

Lauren Neal is a rising 2L at Brandeis School of Law and will spend summer 2021 as a legal intern with Kentucky Equal Justice Center. Kentucky Equal Justice Center is a non-profit that serves and advocates for low-income and underrepresented residents within Kentucky. During her time with KEJC she will work on several projects concerning housing and advocacy in Louisville, KY. The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted everyone and preventing evictions during this difficult time is especially important. Prior to her start in law school, she was a legislative intern for the Indiana House Democratic Caucus and the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus where she was able to advocate and help close the communication gap between legislators and community members within Indiana. Lauren will graduate from Brandeis in May 2023.


2021

Bailey Martin

Bailey Martin is a rising 2L at the University of Minnesota Law School. After graduating undergrad, she worked for the state of Ohio and nonprofits in Columbus, Ohio, in areas of affordable housing, community development, mental health, and community outreach. In law school, Bailey focuses on issues related to criminal justice reform and criminal defense and is passionate about advocating for the rights of people who are incarcerated. This summer, Bailey will be working with the Capital Habeas Unit in the Federal Public Defender Office – Southern District of Ohio. This unit represents Ohioans on death row in their federal habeas appeals, which are often their last available appeals. Bailey is excited and honored to have the opportunity to serve these clients and collaborate with attorneys dedicated to protecting the rights and lives of Ohioans on death row.


2020

Divya Babbula

Divya Babbula, a student at the City University of New York, will spend her summer as a law clerk at the Austin-based Texas Civil Rights Project (TCRP). Divya’s work will address voting rights, racial and economic justice, and criminal justice reform, all of which are more urgent under COVID-19. She will primarily support TCRP’s voting rights litigation and legal advocacy to increase access to the democratic process and grassroots voter mobilization efforts. Prior to this clerkship, Divya has worked on immigrant justice, fair housing, and community economic development as an organizer and legal worker in Texas. As the pandemic exposes structural inequalities, she is determined to be a public interest lawyer in the South building political and economic power of marginalized communities.


2020

Austin Field

Austin Field, a student at the University of Washington School of Law, will spend this summer as a legal intern with the Public Defender Association, a Seattle-based nonprofit that advocates for criminal justice reform. As an intern with the Association’s Racial Disparity Project, Austin will support efforts to protect civil liberties by ending discriminatory policing and promoting police accountability. Prior to attending law school, Austin served as an Army officer and as an investigator for the Bronx Defenders. Inspired by his experiences at the Bronx Defenders, Austin decided to attend the University of Washington School of Law and become a public defender.


2018

Kyla Kaplan

Kyla Kaplan is a student at the University of Maryland School of Law spending her summer working at the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC). Kyla’s work will address issues of food insecurity and unequal access as well as the creation of sustainable food systems. Prior to her work at FLPC Kyla has spent many years working in and around food sustainability, food waste reduction, and improving the systems that affect what we eat and how it is produced.


About Robert Masur

Robert Masur dedicated his legal career to protecting the rights of the unemployed, minorities and the poor. A 1973 graduate of Stanford Law School, he spent six years at the Legal Assistance Foundation of Chicago where he litigated a number of employment and consumer law cases. In 1976, he successfully argued an employment discrimination case before the Supreme Court. He entered private practice in 1981, where he focused on consumer protection law. His friends and family established the Robert Masur Fellowship in his memory to support the work to which he was dedicated, and to encourage young people to pursue public-interest legal careers.