Nick turse

Nick Turse is a fellow at Type Media Center, an investigative reporter, the managing editor TomDispatch, the co-founder of Dispatch Books, and a contributing writer at The Intercept. He is the author or co-author of seven books, most recently Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan, which was a finalist for the 2016 Investigative Reporters and Editors book award, and the New York Times bestseller Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam, which received a 2014 American Book Award.

Turse’s work, alone and in collaboration, has been recognized with a number of honors including a Ridenhour Prize for Investigative Reporting, a James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, an I.F. Stone “Izzy” Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Journalism, a New York Press Club Award for Special Event Reporting, and an Editor & Publisher “Eppy” Award for Best Investigative Feature, among others.

Turse has also received an Ochberg Fellowship from the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Lannan Foundation Writer’s Residency in Marfa, Texas. He has previously been a fellow at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and New York University’s Center for the United States and the Cold War. He has a PhD in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University.

Recent Work

A Slaughter in Silence

A Slaughter in Silence

How a brutal ethnic cleansing campaign in DRC was made worse by Trump’s “America First” policies and the world’s neglect.

Where the Bodies Aren’t Buried

Where the Bodies Aren’t Buried

Bearing witness to a murder — and a message — on a dirt path in South Sudan. By Nick Turse in Columbia Journalism Review.

Ghost Nation

Ghost Nation

An ethnic-cleansing campaign by the government threatens to empty South Sudan. By Nick Turse in Harper’s.

Books
Next Time They'll Come to Count the Dead

Next Time They'll Come to Count the Dead

For six weeks in the Spring of 2015, award-winning journalist Nick Turse traveled on foot as well as by car, SUV, and helicopter around war-torn South Sudan talking to military officers and child soldiers, United Nations officials and humanitarian workers, civil servants, civil society activists, and internally displaced persons–people whose lives had been blown apart by a ceaseless conflict there. In fast-paced and dramatic fashion, Turse reveals the harsh reality of modern warfare in the developing world and the ways people manage to survive the unimaginable.

Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead isn’t about combat, it’s about the human condition, about ordinary people thrust into extraordinary circumstances, about death, life, and the crimes of war in the newest nation on earth.

Tomorrow's Battlefield

Tomorrow's Battlefield

You won’t see segments about it on the nightly news or read about it on the front page of America’s newspapers, but the Pentagon is fighting a new shadow war in Africa, helping to destabilize whole countries and preparing the ground for future blowback. Behind closed doors, U.S. officers now claim that “Africa is the battlefield of tomorrow, today.” In Tomorrow’s Battlefield, award-winning journalist and bestselling author Nick Turse exposes the shocking true story of the U.S. military’s spreading secret wars in Africa.

Kill Anything That Moves

Kill Anything That Moves

Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were isolated incidents in the Vietnam War, carried out by just a few “bad apples.” But as award-winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this groundbreaking investigation, violence against Vietnamese noncombatants was not at all exceptional during the conflict. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of official orders to “kill anything that moves.”

Drawing on more than a decade of research into secret Pentagon archives and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Turse reveals for the first time the workings of a military machine that resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded-what one soldier called “a My Lai a month.” Devastating and definitive, Kill Anything That Moves finally brings us face-to-face with the truth of a war that haunts America to this day.

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Our work is made possible through the generous support of individuals and institutions committed to a free and independent press, civil liberties, and social justice. We are a 501(c)(3) public foundation, and donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent provided by law. If you have any questions, or would like other donation options, contact Kristine at (212) 822-0263.

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