Past Highlights

Don’t Fall for the Carbon Tax Trap

Don’t Fall for the Carbon Tax Trap

The centrist policy framed as a win-win on fiscal and environmental sustainability is a red herring.
By Kate Aronoff for The New Republic

Now Available from Bold Type Books: The Disordered Cosmos

Now Available from Bold Type Books: The Disordered Cosmos

In this book Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein shares her love for physics, from the physics of melanin in skin, to the latest theories of dark matter — all with a new spin informed by history, politics, and the wisdom of Star Trek.

Strangers in a Homeland

Strangers in a Homeland

In Kabul, one of the world’s most dangerous cities, one man works to help Afghan asylum seekers return to a place they never knew.
By May Jeong for VQR

Opinion: Why Senate Republicans fear Deb Haaland

Opinion: Why Senate Republicans fear Deb Haaland

Conservatives have portrayed Haaland as a divisive partisan, but in 2019, she introduced the most bills with bipartisan support of all House freshmen.
By Julian Brave NoiseCat for Washington Post

FT Business Books: January Edition

FT Business Books: January Edition

The Financial Times recommends reading Type Fellow Sarah Jaffe’s new book “Work Won’t Love You Back.”
By Andrew Hill in The Financial Times.

Defanged.

Defanged.

Money and politics could doom the Florida panther — and the Endangered Species Act.
By Jimmy Tobias in The Intercept.

They’ve Showed Us Who They Are

They’ve Showed Us Who They Are

The assault on the Capitol inspired by President Trump was a tragic event, but it illuminated the national landscape like a flash.
By Joe Conason in The National Memo.

Will They Ever Be Over?

Will They Ever Be Over?

The 20th anniversary of the war on terror arrives.
By Nick Turse in TomDispatch.

Covid-19 Has Been Hardest on Women

Covid-19 Has Been Hardest on Women

When money is tight and time is tighter, the basic structure of male supremacy shows itself to be remarkably intact.
By Katha Pollitt in The Nation.

‘No Choice but to Do It’

‘No Choice but to Do It’

Many of the 230,000 women and girls in U.S. jails and prisons were abuse survivors before they entered the system.
By Justine van der Leun in The Appeal and The New Republic.

The Risk Makers

The Risk Makers

Viral hate, election interference, and hacked accounts: inside the tech industry’s decades-long failure to reckon with risk.
By Catherine Buni and Soraya Chemaly in OneZero.

Confinement and Contagion

Confinement and Contagion

In February, Tomiekia Johnson’s mother, father, sister, and daughter came to Central California Women’s Facility (CCWF).
By Justine van der Leun in The New York Review of Books.

For The Generals, A Duty To Speak Up Now

For The Generals, A Duty To Speak Up Now

So far nobody in the United States military has expressed great surprise over President Trump’s alleged remarks about soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice.
By Joe Conason in The National Memo.

The Empty Cases

The Empty Cases

A look at how things might change in British museums as a result of the Black Lives Matter movement.
By Gary Younge in BBC Radio 4.

The Abolition Movement

The Abolition Movement

What we talk about when we talk about addressing the savage roots of policing: justice and safety for everyone.
By Josie Duffy Rice in Vanity Fair.

Cold as ICE

Cold as ICE

How local sheriffs are driving Trump’s deportation agenda.
By Seth Freed Wessler in Mother Jones.

Could Wonder Woman Save Us From Covid-19?

Could Wonder Woman Save Us From Covid-19?

Our leaders are as bad as any comic book villain. But even they might be no match for Wonder Woman’s Lasso of Truth—or Spider-man’s web shooters or Shuri’s brain.
By Elie Mystal in The Nation.

U.S. Capitalism Is in Total Meltdown

U.S. Capitalism Is in Total Meltdown

The COVID-19 pandemic is like Hurricane Katrina, but for the entire country. And things are only going to get worse.
By Sarah Jaffe in The Progressive.

Neglected in Care

Neglected in Care

Long before the coronavirus devastated nursing homes, inadequate staffing in for-profit Texas facilities endangered residents, leading to injuries and deaths.
By Elena Mejía Lutz in The Texas Observer.

What No Patriot Would Ever Do

What No Patriot Would Ever Do

“Performative patriotism” is a fancy way of describing what my father called “jelly-bellied flag flappers.”
By Joe Conason in The National Memo.

How to Fight Coronavirus and Climate Change at Once

How to Fight Coronavirus and Climate Change at Once

While millions of Americans all across the country are sick and out of work, there is no question low-income communities of color are being hit harder than others.
By Julian Brave NoiseCat in Crooked Media.

Minority Exclusion at the Makeshift Morgue

Minority Exclusion at the Makeshift Morgue

Across the U.S., temporary facilities built in response to COVID-19 went up quickly and minority contractors were left out.
By Rebecca Rivas in The St. Louis American.

“Injury to All” at Rutgers University

“Injury to All” at Rutgers University

A coalition of unions representing 20,000 workers is organizing to reject the university’s austerity response to the pandemic.
By Sarah Jaffe in Dissent.

The Union Drive at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

The Union Drive at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

“Amplifying our concerns about going back to work,” says museum educator Sarah Shaw, “is also a way of amplifying the concerns of other frontline workers.”
By Sarah Jaffe in Dissent.

Reflections on Rage and Reform

Reflections on Rage and Reform

I was stunned into hand-over-mouth silence as I sat on my couch watching the murder of George Floyd.
By Sylvia A. Harvey in Type Investigations.

Essential Business

Essential Business

Keeping the Bronx fed in the midst of a pandemic
By Rozina Ali in Harper’s.

What Does It Mean to Defund or Abolish the Police?

What Does It Mean to Defund or Abolish the Police?

Trevor Noah speaks with panelists about the recent progress of the Black Lives Matter movement, the call to defund the police, and community-based alternatives.
Featuring Mychal Denzel Smith and Josie Duffy Rice on The Daily Show.

Plague Poem

Plague Poem

Perhaps it is best that we go away now, bundle up our tyrants, lies and balloons, our screams.
By Kata Pollitt in Lit Hub.

‘I’m pretty sure I should be going home’

‘I’m pretty sure I should be going home’

As COVID-19 deaths mount in Michigan prisons, the review of questionable convictions has slowed, leaving prisoners vulnerable to the disease.
By Aaron Miguel Cantú in The Appeal.

Building Service Workers Strike

Building Service Workers Strike

Workers at 75 Wall Street in New York are demanding management return to the bargaining table.
By Sarah Jaffe in Dissent.

The Growing Power of West Virginia’s Teachers

The Growing Power of West Virginia’s Teachers

When the Mountain State’s teachers went on strike in 2018, they inspired a movement—now they’re showing us how to build a better union.
By Sarah Jaffe in The Progressive.

Paying Off Your Paid Leave

Paying Off Your Paid Leave

Many workers who need more sick time than they’ve accrued end up having to pay back their employers and go into ‘PTO debt.’
By Sarah Jaffe in The American Prospect.

Sephora Makes Plans to Reopen

Sephora Makes Plans to Reopen

“They have very unrealistic expectations of workers sacrificing their health so that people can buy makeup.”
By Sarah Jaffe in Dissent.

Death of a Survivor

Death of a Survivor

In April, Darlene “Lulu” Benson-Seay became the first woman incarcerated by New York State to die from Covid-19. Should she have been in prison in the first place?
By Justine van der Leun in The New Republic.

The Last 16 Days Of Robert Beaupre’s Life

The Last 16 Days Of Robert Beaupre’s Life

“Beau” is one of about 2,400 people who have died of COVID-19 in Michigan. Texts, diaries and photos detailed his last days in remarkable detail.
By Patricia Anstett in HuffPost.

Where Have All the Flowers Gone?

Where Have All the Flowers Gone?

My days have been spent inside mostly. But when I’m out for my daily walk, I delight in seeing flowers in the park by my apartment.
By Collier Meyerson in the Intelligencer.

Detroit’s Health Care Workers Ask: ‘How Many Lives Can We Save?’

Detroit’s Health Care Workers Ask: ‘How Many Lives Can We Save?’

Doctors and nurses in one of the nation’s poorest, blackest big cities are fighting a raging coronavirus outbreak and a flawed health care system. Here’s what life is like for them right now.
By Patricia Anstett, Jonathan Cohn, Tom Perkins and Anna Clark in HuffPost.

How Much Is an Unkosher Torah Worth?

How Much Is an Unkosher Torah Worth?

Inside the murky world of Torah appraisal and a prominent evangelical’s gift to the Museum of the Bible of thousands of unusable scrolls.
By Hella Winston in The Jewish Week.

Doulas Are Going Virtual

Doulas Are Going Virtual

As the novel coronavirus continues to ravage New York City, doulas have had to adapt their methods.
By Collier Meyerson in the Intelligencer.

Welfare for Wall Street

Welfare for Wall Street

As in 2008, the financial relief package leaves most Americans behind. It’s only a matter of time before it leads to an even bigger crisis.
By Nomi Prins in The Nation.

The Skies Are Emptying Out

The Skies Are Emptying Out

Mourning the world I thought I grew up in, and the birds I thought I knew.
By Tom Engelhardt in The Nation.

We Can Build a Better World After COVID-19

We Can Build a Better World After COVID-19

When the crisis is over, the question should not be, “How do we get everyone back to work?” but “Why weren’t we valuing our workers to begin with?”
By Sarah Jaffe in The Progressive.

What The Pandemic Tells Us About Our Politics

What The Pandemic Tells Us About Our Politics

When Americans are confronting the most threatening national crisis in a generation, it would be uplifting to offer a few encouraging words about the president.
By Joe Conason in The National Memo.

The Democrats Screwed Up

The Democrats Screwed Up

Nancy Pelosi and other party leaders have been outflanked by opponents embracing big spending ideas to address the coronavirus recession.
By Kate Aronoff in The New Republic.

A Tale of Two Plagues

A Tale of Two Plagues

Tips on self-isolation from Daniel Defoe and Giovanni Boccaccio
By Katha Pollitt in The Nation.

Last Chance at Justice

Last Chance at Justice

History tells us that, in a time of crisis, we have to be careful about how we respond.
By Seth Freed Wessler in WNYC’s United States of Anxiety.

In Search of Promised Lands

In Search of Promised Lands

Uprooted repeatedly by development projects, the Oujé-Bougoumou Cree wandered boreal Quebec for 70 years before finding a permanent home. For some, the journey continues.
By Julian Brave NoiseCate in Canadian Geographic.

The House on Magnolia Street

The House on Magnolia Street

How a group of homeless mothers took on a housing crisis
By Julian Brave NoiseCat in The California Sunday Magazine.

Sara Nelson Says People Are Ready for Solidarity

Sara Nelson Says People Are Ready for Solidarity

The president of the Association of Flight Attendants tells Sarah Jaffe that the pandemic reveals what unions already know: “An injury to one is an injury to all.”
By Sarah Jaffe in The Nation.

The Reality of American Denialism

The Reality of American Denialism

This pandemic didn’t sneak up on us. It came with us watching and refusing to believe what we saw.
By Lyz Lenz in The Gazette.

Trump Isn’t In Charge—So Who the Hell Is?

Trump Isn’t In Charge—So Who the Hell Is?

In the absence of a serious federal response, it’s up to the 50 state governors, and numerous localities, to figure this out on their own.
By Elie Mystal in The Nation.

In Praise of Winter Running

In Praise of Winter Running

The best runner’s high I’ve ever had was in the dead of winter
By Naomi Gordon-Loebl in The Nation.

Is This the End of Oversharing?

Is This the End of Oversharing?

The internet has been reshaped by a fresh anxiety over posting — and revealing — too much.
By Collier Meyerson in Wired.

Fragility in Liberty

Fragility in Liberty

We travel from Liberty Island to the U.S.-Mexico border to discover how the end of Reconstruction and America’s present-day immigration crisis are inextricably bound.
By Seth Freed Wessler in Type Investigations and WNYC.

Restore Worker Power in Labor Law

Restore Worker Power in Labor Law

The aim of labor policy should be to allow working people more control over their lives.
By Sarah Jaffe in The Progressive.

Excuse Me, Ms.!

Excuse Me, Ms.!

Confused about Latinx, alumnx, even mxn? Fear not: Inclusive language has been evolving for decades.
By Katha Pollitt in The Nation.

Are Kids Bad for the Planet?

Are Kids Bad for the Planet?

The fraught decision to have children—or not—in an era of climate crisis.
By Kate Aronoff in The New Republic.

Labour Activists Canvass in the Cold in Britain

Labour Activists Canvass in the Cold in Britain

The December 12 parliamentary election has brought out Labour’s secret weapon: organizers who have been working for years to end austerity and bring a new politics to the U.K.
By Sarah Jaffe in The American Prospect.

When the Clinics Close

When the Clinics Close

As Planned Parenthoods shutter in Ohio, reproductive rights and justice groups are fighting harder than ever.
By Dani McClain in The Nation.

Streets on Fire

Streets on Fire

From Occupy Wall Street to Extinction Rebellion, this has been a combustible 10 years.
By Gary Younge in The Guardian.

The Evidence That Trump Concealed

The Evidence That Trump Concealed

The accumulating evidence of impeachable offenses by President Donald J. Trump is overwhelming.
By Joe Conason in The National Memo.

Nonprofit Workers Join the Movement to Unionize

Nonprofit Workers Join the Movement to Unionize

Increasing numbers of people in mission- and passion-driven fields are waking up to the fact that they are, despite the trappings of middle-class-ness, still workers doing a job.
By Sarah Jaffe in Common Dreams.

The View from Stevenage

The View from Stevenage

In the first of a three-part series, Gary Younge returns to his home town to see how the bellwether constituency views the election.
By Gary Younge in The Guardian.

Why Prisoners Get the Doctors No One Else Wants

Why Prisoners Get the Doctors No One Else Wants

Even after a major class action suit required Illinois to revamp its prison healthcare system, doctors whose alleged neglect resulted in major injury or death still remain on the prison system payroll.
By Taylor Eldridge in The Appeal.

A Hunger Strike in ICE Detention

A Hunger Strike in ICE Detention

Ajay Kumar, an asylum seeker from India, went on a hunger strike to protest the “animal-like treatment” he faced in ice custody.
By Rozina Ali in The New Yorker.

Things Are Bleak!

Things Are Bleak!

Jonathan Safran Foer’s quest for planetary salvation.
By Kate Aronoff in The Nation.

All Organizing Is Magic

All Organizing Is Magic

In this contribution to Verso’s Caliban and the Witch Roundtable, Sarah Jaffe finds echoes of witchcraft in contemporary anti-capitalism.
By Sarah Jaffe in the Verso blog.

Now House Republicans Hate The Rules They Made

Now House Republicans Hate The Rules They Made

Congressional Republicans don’t want to debate President Donald Trump’s attempt to extort political prosecutions of Americans from Ukraine.
By Joe Conason in The National Memo.

American Brexit

American Brexit

It’s not just Britain headed for the subbasement of imperial history.
By Tom Engelhardt in TomDispatch.

How Abortion Pills Will Shape Our Future

How Abortion Pills Will Shape Our Future

The Supreme Court may make it harder to get to an abortion clinic, but thanks to drugs, coat hangers can remain a thing of the past.
By Katha Pollitt in The Nation.

The Return of the Strike

The Return of the Strike

The picketing GM workers and impending Chicago Teachers Union action suggest a dramatic revival of striking as a tactic.
By Sarah Jaffe in The Progressive.

We need to Talk About Hunter Biden

We need to Talk About Hunter Biden

The growing scandal around Ukraine shows a Biden nomination would be a big gamble – one Democrats would be foolish to make.
By Kate Aronoff in The Guardian.

A Necessary Memoir About Sexual Assault

A Necessary Memoir About Sexual Assault

Chanel Miller’s account of her assault by Stanford swimmer Brock Turner questions the way we treat sexual assault—and sex itself.
By Katha Pollitt in The Nation.

Not Kidding

Not Kidding

Transparent’s bizarre musical finale.
By Naomi Gordon-Loebl in The Nation.

The Four-Day Work Week—Not Just a Daydream

The Four-Day Work Week—Not Just a Daydream

The lessons of the shorter-hours movements of decades past are still deeply relevant, and are being revived for a gig-economy era of diminished opportunities for working people.
By Sarah Jaffe in The Progressive.

Thunberg Is Right

Thunberg Is Right

Congress is ignoring science—and that includes Democrats.
By Kate Aronoff in The Guardian.

On the Precipice

On the Precipice

The collective asteroid of human history.
By Tom Engelhardt in TomDispatch.

A Journey in Search of the American Left

A Journey in Search of the American Left

The first in a five-day series where our writer gauges the mood of US progressives during a 10-day trip across the country.
By Gary Younge in the Guardian.

As the World Burns

As the World Burns

Catastrophes in the Amazon and elsewhere are flash points for the larger, ongoing crisis that claims lives in less spectacular fashion.
By Sarah Jaffe in the Progressive.

The Kashmiri Narrative

The Kashmiri Narrative

For many Kashmiris, the media’s persistent focus on the India-Pakistan binary misses a key part of the story.
By Rozina Ali in the Columbia Journalism Review.

The Killing Never Ends

The Killing Never Ends

On a sunny July afternoon in 2010, I stood among a solemn crowd gathered in the intense California heat.
By Nick Turse in Jacobin.

Bad Boss Trump, the Great Organizer

Bad Boss Trump, the Great Organizer

Working people at all levels are beginning to understand how their interests are not that different.
By Sarah Jaffe in the Progressive.

Remembering Toni Morrison

Remembering Toni Morrison

Four writers pay tribute to a great American novelist and groundbreaking intellect.
By Mychal Denzel Smith and others in the New Republic.

The Real Trouble with Ilhan Omar

The Real Trouble with Ilhan Omar

While others on the left waffle on questions of imperial power and foreign relations, the freshman Democrat takes on American hegemony.
By Sarah Jaffe in the Progressive.

To Fight Trump, Take to the Streets!

To Fight Trump, Take to the Streets!

The Trump administration gets more malicious, harmful, and absurd every day. So why aren’t many of us outside protesting?
By Katha Pollitt in the Nation.

Britain Is Run by A Self-Serving Clique

Britain Is Run by A Self-Serving Clique

Government and culture are dominated by the same narrow section of the population. It’s no way to run a country.
By Gary Younge in the Guardian.

The Opposite of Patriotism

The Opposite of Patriotism

The right enjoys no monopoly on patriotism — and on this Fourth of July, their grotesque fealty to Trumpism will prove the point again.
By Joe Conason in the National Memo.

The Road Not Taken

The Road Not Taken

The shuttering of the GM works in Lordstown will also bury a lost chapter in the fight for workers’ control.
By Sarah Jaffe in the .

McConnell And Trump: Democracy’s Enemies Within

McConnell And Trump: Democracy’s Enemies Within

Among the most disturbing moments during the last presidential election cycle occurred in September 2016, when a group of top intelligence officials briefed congressional leaders on the Kremlin’s aggressive hacking campaign.
By Joe Conason in the National Memo.

Wall Street Goes Silent on #MeToo

Wall Street Goes Silent on #MeToo

You might think that, a year and a half into the #MeToo movement, sexual harassment would be a front-burner issue for the people paid to diversify Wall Street.
By Susan Antilla in the Intercept.

Changing the Game

Changing the Game

Naomi Klein argues that tackling environmental and economic problems must coincide.
By Naomi Klein in the Times Literary Supplement.

A Man’s Guide to Abortion

A Man’s Guide to Abortion

You don’t have to be a woman to stand up for reproductive rights.
By Katha Pollitt in the Nation.

The European Far Right’s Environmental Turn

The European Far Right’s Environmental Turn

As climate change becomes a central concern for voters across the continent, right-wing parties are beginning to incorporate green politics into their ethno-nationalist vision.
By Kate Aronoff in Dissent.

Ways to Save the World

Ways to Save the World

If we really want to make a difference this Earth Day, we have to confront the problem of climate change at its source.

By Kate Aronoff in the Progressive.

A Message From the Future

A Message From the Future

What if we actually pulled off a Green New Deal? What would the future look like then?

By Naomi Klein in the Intercept.

Eliza Griswold wins the Ridenhour Book Prize

Eliza Griswold wins the Ridenhour Book Prize

In Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America, Griswold told the story of the energy boom’s impact on a small town and one woman’s transformation from a struggling single parent to an unlikely activist. Sheri Fink presented her with the prize.

Alexandria Bombach wins the Ridenhour Documentary Film Prize

Alexandria Bombach wins the Ridenhour Documentary Film Prize

On Her Shoulders followed Nadia Murad, a 23-year-old Yazidi woman who survived genocide and sexual slavery committed by ISIS, then told her story to politicians and media, including at the United Nations. Murad was one of the two winners of the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize. Ronit Avni presented her with the prize.

Still Funding Confederacy

Still Funding Confederacy

For more than 100 years, the Virginia and other former slave states have been subsidizing not only Confederate cemeteries, but many of the hundreds of Confederate monuments and “heritage” sites that mark public space across the South.

By Brian Palmer in Richmond Free Press.

Right Makes Might

Right Makes Might

Long before Trump came on the scene, key congressional Republicans had been sidling up to nativist and authoritarian leaders across the globe.

By Sarah Posner in the New Republic.

The End of the City on a Hill

The End of the City on a Hill

A burgeoning alliance with Europe’s far right is radically altering the Christian right’s view of American democracy.

By Sarah Posner in VICE Magazine.

Applications for internships now open

Applications for internships now open

We’re looking to hire for the Harriet and Perry Grover Editorial Internship at Bold Type Books and the Don and Doris Shaffer Internship at Type Investigations.

Every Black Woman Deserves a Doula

Every Black Woman Deserves a Doula

On the December day I found out I was carrying a baby, the only thing I could think about was my own mortality.

By Collier Meyerson in New York Magazine.

A Desperate Bargain

A Desperate Bargain

Throughout the country parents of children with severe mental illness feel pressured to give up custody to obtain treatment.

By Juliana Schatz Preston for Reveal.

A Tale of Two Toxic Cities

A Tale of Two Toxic Cities

The EPA’s Bungled Response to an Air Pollution Crisis Exposes a Toxic Racial Divide.
By Sharon Lerner in the Intercept.

The Missing Black Millennial

The Missing Black Millennial

No generation has undergone such meticulous examination in recent years as the millennials. Yet our understanding of them contains a glaring gap.
By Reniqua Allen in the New Republic.

She’s With Stupid

She’s With Stupid

Sure, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slips up sometimes–but have you listened to her Republican colleagues?
By Katha Pollitt in The Nation.

Day Care for All

Day Care for All

The progressive to-do list is missing a very important idea.
By Katha Pollitt in the New York Times.

Judicial Elections

Judicial Elections

Mass incarceration doesn’t just happen. One under-examined factor is the relationship between judges and corporate money/big business interests.
Fellow Josie Duffy Rice  co-hosts a discussion on Justice in America.

Real Black History

Real Black History

Real Black History (Abridged).
Mychal Denzel Smith  on Full Frontal with Samantha Bee.

Conviction

Conviction

A 7-part podcast series tells how the pursuit of justice drives two men to fight each other in the courts and on the streets of New York.
By Saki Knafo in Gimlet.

How Afghans Have Adapted to Life After Losing a Limb

How Afghans Have Adapted to Life After Losing a Limb

“What is most difficult for us to imagine is not tragedy but the prospect of living in its aftermath.” By Matthieu Aikins in the New York Times Magazine, with photographs by Ross McDonnell.

Broken Justice in the 42

Broken Justice in the 42

In the poorest congressional district in the country, where thousands of people are arrested each year, one former cop with a complicated past has made high-profile prosecutions fall apart.
By Saki Knafo in The New York Times Magazine.

Expecting Care

Expecting Care

How Texas is failing foster kids and contributing to an alarming teen pregnancy rate.
By Rebecca Grant in Texas Observer.

Shout Out to Criminal Justice Reformers

Shout Out to Criminal Justice Reformers

As the Justice in America Podcast returns for a second season, our fellow Josie Duffy Rice and Clint Smith III talk to Colorlines about the activists and organizations fighting to remake the nation’s criminal justice system.

By Josie Duffy Rice in Colorlines.

After Words on C-SPAN

After Words on C-SPAN

Is the “American Dream” is still attainable?

Reniqua Allen on Book TV’s After Words.

Stepping Up

Stepping Up

As the incarceration of mothers increases in the United States, who cares for the children left behind?

By Sylvia A. Harvey, in Virginia Quarterly Review

Our 2018 Gala

Our 2018 Gala

We were humbled to honor co-founders of March For Our Lives with the 2018 Puffin Prize for Creative Citizenship. Thanks to Wyatt Cenac for a moving tribute to the courageous work of Delaney Tarr, Jaclyn Corin, and Avalon Fenster, and so many others.

The Costs of the Confederacy

The Costs of the Confederacy

Taxpayers have spent at least $40 million on Confederate monuments and groups that perpetuate racist ideology — in the last decade alone.

By Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler in Smithsonian Magazine

Marijuana Comes to Coalinga

Marijuana Comes to Coalinga

The weed business promised to save this struggling California town. So far, it’s been a bust.
By Rozina Ali in the Nation.

A Culture of No

A Culture of No

The fate of people seeking asylum in the United States is determined not just by the legitimacy of their claims, but by where they land. This is the story of how one immigration court in Texas has shut the door on those seeking refuge in America.
By Justine van der Leun in the Virginia Quarterly Review.

The Color of Discipline

The Color of Discipline

My daughter is leaving marks—nicks from her fingernails, impressions from her teeth—across my body.
By Dani McClain in the Rumpus.

The Final, Terrible Voyage of the Nautilus

The Final, Terrible Voyage of the Nautilus

On May 3, 2008, a sunny Saturday in Copenhagen, a crowd gathered along a dock to watch a 58-foot submarine be lowered into the water.
By May Jeong in Wired.

Slavery and the Contradictions of James Madison

Slavery and the Contradictions of James Madison

While drafting the Constitution, James Madison strove to ensure the protection of minority rights but also proposed that a slave be counted as three-fifths of a person.
By Pamela Newkirk in The Washington Post.

Conspiracy Theories, Fake News, Racism Fueling KKK’s Rise

Conspiracy Theories, Fake News, Racism Fueling KKK’s Rise

In the 1920s, the Ku Klux Klan experienced a resurgence fueled by the grievances of white populists, conspiracy theories, fake news, skepticism of science, and hostility toward Jews, immigrants and racial minorities.
By Pamela Newkirk in The Washington Post.

Is White Rage Driving Our Racial Divide?

Is White Rage Driving Our Racial Divide?

The virulent backlash against President Obama’s 2008 election set the stage for this year’s presidential campaign, in which Muslims, Mexicans and other marginalized groups have been explicitly maligned.
By Pamela Newkirk in The Washington Post.

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